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  • CONSULTING
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Critical Infrastructure
In times of emergency, communications infrastructures that support our first responders are vital. Police and fire departments, federal agencies, and other groups such as utilities have mission-critical communications requirements. Whether utilizing traditional UHF networks or the 4.9 GHz public safety band critical communications demand high network reliability and security.
 
Border PatrolPublic safety agencies rely on their two-way networks for everyday and emergency communication. These private networks' infrastructure, mobile, and personal equipment require ongoing maintenance. Network operators must also keep up with changing demands, e.g. extending in-building coverage.

Sending data wirelessly has become increasingly important, and an expected standard, for critical networks. Information flow must work in both directions. That is, a critical network must be able to both pull information from the field as well as push information to mobile workers. For example, a policeman doing a routine traffic stop must be able to submit license information and receive back information on the driver's criminal record.

First responders must be able to communicate during emergencies, regardless of the devices they carry or the frequencies on which they communicate. Interoperability equipment allows agencies to accomplish this without having to purchase new devices, allowing for connections between two-way radios, phones, and VoIP connections. Agencies may also elect to deploy a shared system, where all users are operating on the same platform, whether the P25 standard, or a proprietary system.

Wireless networks help people and businesses stay connected when wired systems and power supplies are interrupted. Agencies must be able to keep critical communication networks up and running during emergency situations and power outages through redundant systems or a completely separate wireless network infrastructure.